The Curse of Ham: Race and Slavery in Early Judaism, Christianity, and Islam By David M. Goldenberg

  Note too that the early Arab (not African) leader 'Ubada inb al-Samit is described as a black (aswad) man, and consider the expression used by the Arabic writers to…

Continue Reading The Curse of Ham: Race and Slavery in Early Judaism, Christianity, and Islam By David M. Goldenberg
An “Arap (Arab)” According to Vladimir Dal’s 1863 Dictionary, meant a “Black-skinned Person”
Painting of Emperor's palace with an arap serving there. Mihály Zichy/Hermitage Museum

An “Arap (Arab)” According to Vladimir Dal’s 1863 Dictionary, meant a “Black-skinned Person”

"To the Cushite race belonged the oldest and purest Arabian blood. They were the original Arabians and the creators of the ancient civilization, evidences of which may be seen in…

Continue Reading An “Arap (Arab)” According to Vladimir Dal’s 1863 Dictionary, meant a “Black-skinned Person”